“DEEP GREEN” THE KRILL IS GONE


KRILL

Ocean food chains are threatened by acidity caused by burning fossil fuels for energy.

Al Ba Core

Al Ba Core tries to warn the other fish in the ocean that there is way too much CO2.

RELEASE DATE:  2010
DIRECTOR:  Jeffrey Bost
VOICEOVER TALENT:  SpongeBob’s Tom Kenny and Jill Taley

FILM FESTIVALS

  • SAN FRANCISCO OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL – Winner, Best Short
  • BLUE OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL (Monterey, CA) – Winner, Children’s Programming
  • ARTIVIST FILM FESTIVAL (New York / Los Angeles) – Winner, Environmental Preservation Award
  • CINEMA VERDE FILM FESTIVAL (Florida) – Winner, Sustainability Award
  • SAN FRANCISCO GREEN FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • PLANET IN FOCUS ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • DC ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • GREEN FILM FESTIVAL (Korea) – Official Entry
  • GLOBIANS DOC-FEST (Berlin) – Official Entry
  • OLYMPIA DOC FEST (Washington) – Official Entry
  • SOULFUL CINEMA FILM FESTIVAL (Australia) – Official Entry
  • ALASKA FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • SONOMA ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • NEW YORK WILD FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • GEOGRAPHY OF HOPE FILM FESTIVAL – Official Entry
  • OCEAN FILM FESTIVAL (Savannah, Georgia) – Official Entry
  • EARTH DAY SANTA BARBARA FILM FESTIVAL– Official Entry
  • 1ST ANNUAL PALO ALTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (CA) – Official Entry

PLOT SUMMARY:

THE PROBLEM…..”Like a tooth dipped in a glass of Coca-Cola, coral reefs, lobsters and other marine creatures that build calcified shells around themselves could soon dissolve as climate change turns the oceans increasingly acidic.  The carbon dioxide spewed into the atmosphere by factories, cars and power plants is not just raising temperatures. It is also causing what scientists call ‘ocean acidification’ as around 25 percent of the excess CO2 is absorbed by the seas.  The threat to hard-bodied marine organisms, such as coral reefs already struggling with warming waters, is alarming…”  Reuters

“The Krill Is Gone” features world-class animation and a cast of clever characters to show us how burning fossil fuels is impacting the world’s fragile underwater ecosystems.  As the story unfolds, we meet Emiliania Huxleyi, a newscaster about to reveal startling new evidence on the menace of rising acidity in our oceans; a shrill little krill who frets that she can’t grow another shell; a wise-cracking comic who cruelly jokes that the krill are losing their crunch; and visiting celebrity Al Ba Core, a tuna on a mission to save the planet.

READ MORE ABOUT OCEAN ACIDIFICATION:

Director’s Statement by Jeffrey Bost

“Wow. The making of ‘The Krill is Gone’ was one of the longest and most satisfying pieces of animation that I have ever worked on. Matt Briggs has this amazing ability to charge a project with so much positive energy that it begins to develop a momentum of its own, and that was certainly the case here. Over the year and a half that we were in production on the ‘Deep Green’’s animations, almost everyone at Bent who was involved in the project demonstrated a level of performance that exceeded my already high expectations.

“From the beginning, the Krill piece was conceived as a 2D collage of animated cutouts assembled and animated in After Effects. But as the character designs began to appear from Huy Vu’s drawing board, and the CG modelers breathed life into these characters, it became clear that the spot was taking on a life of its own.

Ray DiCarlo, the Executive Producer at Bent, made this clear, after taking a long and appreciative look at the work coming out of the CG lab. „You know we have to do this in 3D,’ he said quietly. Coming from any other EP, I might have been shocked to hear that I was being asked to take a more expensive and laborious path on our shoestring budget, but with Ray I wasn’t so much surprised as delighted. He is always about the quality. And so the project continued to morph.

“The original script that Matt and Clark Taylor had sent was great fun, if epic. I was reminded by David Daniels that we weren’t remaking ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ and with his and Chel White’s input and a constant flow of new takes and line revisions between Clark, myself, and eventually the great voice talent of Tom Kenny, we ended up with a telling that could fit within the constraints that we assigned ourselves.

“Perhaps the largest challenge to the project was the creation of a vast and diverse undersea world that could be composited and adjusted to the needs of the animation created and performed in an entirely different platform. After Effects was both the compositing and editing tool for this spot, and I was often confronted with a need for unique solutions that were both fast and effective, and so I often found myself seated at the hem of the Bent compositors. Led by fellow ‘Deep Green’s’ director Randy Wakerlin, this group was almost always in house working on one deadline or another, so I had an almost constant access to the fruits of their collective creativity. In the end, it was Orland Nutt who had the last look at the Krill animation, bringing a depth and polish to it that one might expect from a master oil painter, if not a digital Compositor.

“In the final sequence, the angularity of the Expressionists with their angry color palettes seemed a perfect contrast to the soft shapes and cool colors that had filled the undersea world. This was an important image in the animation and ultimately the film itself. I knew it. Matt knew it. Dave Manuel knew it. I finally found an opening in Dave‟s schedule long enough for him to execute it. His delicate touch with direct and reflected light interwoven with a world that is at once real and caricatured allowed us to bridge the gap between these two worlds and to achieve a lasting and powerful final image.”

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Credits

Filmmakers